Articles tagged with: click2save

01 August 2013

Make Your Neighborhood Your Cathedral: My Pilgrimage to Humble Walk

Posted in ELCA, Emerging, Church

humblewalkweb

When I was younger, I pilgrimaged to medieval cathedrals. Now I pilgrimage to new mission churches.

Last week, I made pilgrimage to Humble Walk Lutheran Church in St. Paul, Minnesota, a mission start congregation of the ELCA.

Humble Walk is true inspiration to me. Their pastor Jodi Houge is just amazing and gave one of my favorite interviews in Click2Save: The Digital Ministry Bible. As she told us there,

"We recognized that most people don't come looking for a church, in our demographic. And so, we through from the beginning, 'We know this. The church is sinking.' The facts are on the table for the mainline denominations. So, we're not going to these big glossy things that try to draw people to our cool, fancy, hip church. We're going to be where people already are and try to be the church where they are."

19 June 2013

What's Your Tough Mudder?

Posted in Leadership, Church

tough mudderWhen was the last time you set an audacious goal for yourself—when you committed yourself to something you weren’t sure you could actually do?

Last month I participated in the Tough Mudder. It’s a 10 mile course with 20 obstacles that include, among other things, lots of crawling, climbing, and jumping into freezing cold water.

It’s designed by British Special Forces and described as “probably the toughest event on the planet.” You have to climb over an eight-foot wall just to get into the starting area, for God’s sake! And not for nothing, the day of our Tough Mudder was over 90 degrees. So, it is a beast. (Check out the video below for a taste.)

I decided to do the Mudder as a way to motivate myself to get back into great shape. And, honestly, to make me feel better about turning 40 next year.

So, I committed myself to this crazy thing—and to doing something I wasn’t sure I could accomplish. I trained like crazy for five months—running, swimming, suspension training, kettlebells, weight lifting. Many early mornings and many late nights at the Y. It took our team just under three hours to complete the course, but we did it. I finished.

A big part of the Tough Mudder is about confronting fears, whether its jumping off a 20-foot high platform into water below, crawling through dark underground tunnels, or running through electroshocks. And that fear can either paralyze us or it can propel us. That is the fundamental lesson of the Tough Mudder.

22 December 2012

Feast of the Digitally-Integrated Incarnation

Posted in Digital Ministry, Social Media

modern-pastry“And the word became flesh and lived among us....” (John 1:14)

Last summer, one of my Facebook friends I’ve never met, Tracy Pasche-Johannes, a fellow Lutheran pastor from Muncie, Indiana, and her husband, Jeff, were in my hometown of Boston on vacation. “We’re in Boston! Would you like to meet in person?” they asked in a Facebook message.

We had never met before and we had a pretty thin connection to start with: we shared one common friend, who, at one point thought it would be a good idea for us to know each other and introduced us on Facebook. We had observed one another’s status updates, messaged back and forth a few times, but that was pretty much it.

We agreed to meet up for an Italian dinner in Boston’s North End. Over pasta and Chianti, canolli and cappuccino, we fleshed out one another’s status updates and blog posts, putting a voice with our writing, describing our families, locating one another within our ministry and community contexts.

Over the course of the meal, all the words, links, and video we had shared back and forth on Facebook became embodied and enfleshed, and our digital connection grew into a deeper personal relationship. Our dinner was, in the Johannine spirit of “the Word made flesh,” a feast of the incarnation.

19 December 2012

Social Media Strategies for Synods and Dioceses

Posted in ELCA, Resources, Social Media

iphone-iconsChurch judicatories, such as synods and dioceses, have a unique set of challenges and opportunties when it comes to employing digital social media to further their mission and ministry.

In this webinar I led for ELCA synod communicators, I suggest some crucial and often overlooked steps in developing a judicatorial social media strategy by applying the approach to social media for ministry that Elizabeth Drescher and I put forward in our book, Click2Save: The Digital Ministry Bible.

In the course of the webinar I quote Elizabeth, who once noted that, "Institutions don't do social. People do social." One of the dangers of judicatories and larger church institutions is that with the understandable need to disseminate news and information, we lose sight of the point of social media—actually developing relationships, not only with the judicatory or its staff, but congregation to congregation, person to person. It can be more difficult for larger instutions to make the shift from broadcast to social media, marketing to ministry, from the instituitional to the personal—but this is what will ultimately prove most effective.

Much of the advice here also applies to congregations and individuals.

01 February 2012

Churches Evangelizing Churches

Posted in Emerging, Church

photoLast week I had the pleasure of speaking at the annual Rocky Mountain Synod Theological Conference in Fort Collins, Colorado. I presented material from my forthcoming book with Elizabeth Drescher, Click 2 Save: The Digital Ministry Bible, much of which was inspired by my home congregation.

I shared how a strategic goal Redeemer established in 2008 of "improving communications" led to our push into the new world of social media and the subsequent redesigns of our church website. I relayed many of the real life experiences and learnings of our congregation from these last four years.

It was gratifying to see how the things we learned in what I described at the conference as our "wonderfully average" congregation could help other pastors and ministry leaders in using social media, engaging digital culture, and thinking about how we are church today and how we will be church in the future.